This Singapore Founder created over 10,000 Jobs in the past 50 years, yet not many people have heard about him

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A lesson to founders: Be morally upright, and understand your mission very well

 

You probably have heard about Lee Kuan Yew, a visionary in Singapore who shaped the future. However, this article is not about him. It is instead focused on the lesser known, operational aspect of the Singapore Inc. startup, the founder who led economic reforms to generate thousands of jobs, by a man called Philip Yeo.

Accomplished yet Controversial Civil Servant

For those who are between ages of 20 to 35 years old, most likely the name Philip Yeo would probably not ring a bell. To be honest, I also learned about him until around 5 years ago when I applied for a scholarship in his name. He happens to be one of Singapore’s most accomplished yet controversial civil servants who contributed significantly in various areas, specific to our military, economic and biomedical sectors. And yes, he is still going at it today, in his 70s.

Here are three traits that embody his spirit, which he hopes to influence and inspire the next generation of leaders today – in both the private and public sectors, for those who are also neither civil nor servants.

The Hustler: Going against the grain in 1997

It was the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis and while many Multinationals (MNCs) were pulling out of the region, this one man believed in the longer term prospects of this region and packed it together in his suitcase and went hustling to get development projects and investments for this region based in Singapore. Who was MAD enough to invest in Singapore during a recession? Clearly the likes of John Sculley from Apple and Alan Shugart from Seagate were convinced to invest millions into creating the manufacturing projects, kickstarting the economic resurgence as one of the four Asian Tigers in that generation.

Another crazy encounter around that same period was in the dream of Jurong Island. Not many people know this again, but the role of petrochemicals in Singapore’s growth story is a huge one. It was a collection of small islands off the west side of Singapore which was repurposed into one single island. The odds were well and truly stacked against him and his team.

With no land large enough to house petrochemical facilities, companies like Exxon, Mitsui and Chevron had zero confidence to invest millions into Singapore. However, this was not an issue for him. In a typical hustler fashion, he went out to sell projects with a promise, a dream of an international petrochemical hub. Long story short, the project materialised, and today the petrochemical industries in Singapore account for over 10% of the country’s GDP.

The Talent Thief: Grooming the best and brightest

If there is anything he would be probably be known for, it was the ability to spot talent and groom them into leaders. Leveraging off his own experiences as a junior officer under Then-Minister of Defence Goh Keng Swee, he was given the freedom to run projects and to grow his own set of abilities and competencies.

You can’t choose your appearance but you can choose your boss.

As he has repeatedly stressed, good mentors are ones who will be able to play a supporting role, to give his mentees leeway to make mistakes and ultimately grow into responsible and effective leaders — never dominating and controlling too tightly because individuals will never reach their full potential if they are constrained.

To date, he has groomed multiple leaders of industries like George Yeo, Lim Swee Say and others who are leading agencies like A*Star, NUS, JTC, EDB, National Gallery, and EDIS.

Next, was his focus on grooming subject matter experts. As the Economic Development Board (EDB) of Singapore, it was paramount that all the officers who were engaging in complex projects like Genomics, Information technology (IT) and Petrochemicals had to speak the language and terminologies in the respective sectors. Always “walk the walk, and talk the talk” essentially never backing down to a challenge if you truly know your domain knowledge.

Also read: CommGate is working with SPRING Singapore to help retailers go online

The Rule Breaker: Thriving amid tight bureaucracy

Behind the scenes, when interacting with ‘Chairman’, he has stressed that if you have a mission larger than you, larger than your boss, it was always easier to do it first, and do it well. Rather than have to go through multiple hurdles of red tape bureaucracy.

It’s always easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.

Break rules only if you do not directly benefit but instead your actions contributing to a larger picture. At the end of the day, those who you may have offended, will understand that you have done it in the interest of the masses rather than for personal gain.

The classic story was the one where he was tasked to oversee the project of Batam, Indonesia as a potential offshore labor sector for the Multinationals (MNCs) based in Singapore. After much consideration, he decided that he should go ahead with it and brought in millions in investments to build factories and warehouses.

Here’s the catch: He had no land title or full documentation to proceed with the building of these projects. In his words, he “didn’t care” because he needed it to happen and was pressed for time as the MNCs who were in Singapore needed to reduce their operational costs.

The result? He did it in two years, where many others would have probably taken twice or thrice that time to make it happen. Eventually, on the ground breaking ceremony, the two senior officials were more than beaming with delight.

Conclusion: Effective leaders make things happen

As illustrated in the three stories above, the man worked within constraints to do great things, not for himself, but for the economy of Singapore. He knew very well that he had to create thousands of skilled jobs and attract investments for the economy in Singapore to grow.

A lesson to founders? Be morally upright, and understand your mission very well, so that the stakeholders around you —- your bosses and your subordinates — may get offended. But ultimately, you are effective and driven to make things happen.

Also read: Singapore government set to merge SPRING and IE Singapore to promote growth and internationalisation

Want to know more? Join the MAD COW movement

If you enjoyed some of the stories above, you can go deeper to understanding the mind of the maverick himself. One way would be to read the book titled: Neither Civil Nor Servant by Peh Shing Huei, which is available at all major bookstores.

The other way, would be to join the Philip Yeo Initiative program. Embodying the MAD COW Spirit – Make a Difference, Change our World, we are in our 5th year anniversary of the program which aims to nurture a next generation of mission-driven leaders to create change in our economy.

The program gives you access to mentors who are now top industry leaders, who were also nurtured by Philip Yeo with the MAD COW spirit. The associates and change makers who are now part of the program include everyday folks who are working on helping Singaporeans rediscover the kampong spirit through technology, bringing awareness to persons with disabilities to helping people make smarter financial decisions and creating an inclusive culture for Singaporeans. (XYZ). You can find the full list of associates here.

Join our mission to make a difference today!

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Source: e27